Continental Gatorskin rear tire lasts 5,400 miles

My Continental Gatorskin  tire lasted 5,400 miles. (Continental photo)

My Continental Gatorskin tire lasted 5,400 miles. (Continental photo)


5,400 miles. That’s how long my Continental Gatorskin 700 x 28 rear tire lasted. Not bad. It saw quite a few miles of dirt too.

I paid $52 for the tire, so it had better last that long. A small amount of cord is showing, so you know it’s time for replacement.

Recently I ran over a large staple and, although it jammed into the rear tire, it did not cause a flat. I stopped after about five seconds and removed the staple, which had not gone in far enough to cause a flat.

I credit some of my good fortune to riding a quality tire.

I still have a Michelin Pro Optimum on the front with the same mileage and it will probably last until I decide it’s time for a new one, usually when the sidewall begins to fray [I took it off a month later because it looked ratty].

Front tires require close attention because if one blows on a fast descent, you could be in trouble.

One word of advice from Continental in its instruction sheet, written in 16 languages, says to toss your tire, tube and rim strip after three years, irrespective of miles ridden.

I guess I’m just too cheap. I’m riding a tire that’s nine years old. It’s on my rain bike. I stored a tire for 28 years before using it. Worked great.

I ride inner tubes until they have so many holes they’re not worth patching, but usually I have to replace them because the tube fails at the valve.

I’m trying out a Continental Grand Sport Race Road tire next. The 700 x 28 version has an actual 28 mm cross-section. Amazing! Check back in 10 months for my report.

One Response to “Continental Gatorskin rear tire lasts 5,400 miles”

  1. jay Says:

    I’ve having great success with the same tire, although I’m much larger than you and won’t get 5,000 miles on it.

    I agree with Continental’s advice on replacement. Since I very rarely get flats I often overlook replacing inner tubes, but at times have noticed deterioration near the value stem then replaced them. Don’t use plastic rim strips–they are prone to tearing which can lead to a sudden blow out.

    I think tires stored in a wine cellar environment will be safe to ride for many years–however tire mounted on a bike will age even if miles ridden are few.

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