Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Bikes vs. Cars coming to a theater near you

November 29, 2015

Bikes vs. Cars is coming to the Bay Area in December.

Bikes vs. Cars is coming to the Bay Area in December.


I first learned about Bikes vs. Cars a couple years ago through Kickstarter, from which the producer/director Fredrik Gertten raised $80,000 from 2,000 pledges.

In the Bay Area it’s showing Dec. 3-9 in San Francisco at the Roxie theater, in Oakland Dec. 8 and in San Rafael Dec. 4-10.

The movie looks at bicycles and how they are used for transportation from a global perspective. It takes a Michael Moore advocacy slant for bicycles, not that there’s anything wrong with that.

I plan to see it. What might be missing (I haven’t seen anything more than previews) is how the autonomous car fits into the transportation equation. This technology is going to be of enormous benefit for all humankind, bicyclists included, and will certainly ensure continued use of the automobile.

I’m not advocating individual ownership of autonomous cars, such as we almost have now with the Tesla. I took a ride in one and it was truly unnerving, at first.

What I think we’re looking at is the “elevator model.” That means companies like Uber and Lyft will own autonomous cars and use them as horizontal elevators, as suggested by Alain Kornhauser, professor at Princeton. He recently gave a brief talk in Santa Clara at a community forum on autonomous cars.

All of this is at least a decade away, but it’s definitely coming. You can already see companies jockeying for a position within the new transportation model.

As for bicycles, they’ll play an increasing role, but I don’t see them ever becoming the primary means of transportation. The good news is that people who do ride bikes will find things a lot safer.

Now we know why this tree's seed is called a buckeye. It looks like a deer's eye. Contains tannic acid, poisonous.

Now we know why this tree’s seed is called a buckeye. It looks like a deer’s eye. Contains tannic acid, poisonous.

Flooding on Guadalupe River recreation path

November 25, 2015

FYI, the mighty Guadalupe River has submerged parts of the Guadalupe River recreation path.

I saw it beneath the Hwy 237 overpass. While it might have been less than a foot deep, I wasn’t going to risk submerging my bottom bracket.

I can imagine other locations are also under water, such as at the Trimble Road overpass and Hwy 101.

San Tomas Aquino Creek trail is OK with the exception of a wet section beneath the Great America Parkway overpass.

Avoidable accident on Page Mill Road

November 7, 2015

Fatal bike accident scene on Page Mill Road. Road striping needed.

Fatal bike accident scene on Page Mill Road. Road striping needed.


No matter how it played out, there's no reason why Jeffrey Donnelly, age 52, should have been killed while riding his bike on Page Mill Road around 7:30 a.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 3.

I’ve taken Old Page Mill Road to Page Mill Road dozens of times and I can only imagine what happened. The 19-year-old Palo Alto motorist driving a 2014 VW Golf was heading west on Page Mill Road. Donnelly was continuing straight, westbound, on Page Mill Road. Beyond that, I would be speculating.

However, a common scenario here is for a cyclist to move left to access the bike lane, which is positioned on the far left side of Page Mill. At the same time, cars are either continuing straight or heading for the northbound 280 on-ramp. It’s an awkward situation with the overlap but one that is hard to avoid with the double right-turn lanes for Interstate 280 just ahead.

While I believe that the motorist is ultimately most responsible in almost every bike-car collision, Santa Clara County and Palo Alto have some responsibility.

There should be a dashed-lane transition between Old Page Mill and the bike lane. Throw in some green paint for good measure.

It’s common knowledge that Old Page Mill Road is a favorite route for cyclists.

I’m not saying it would guarantee no further accidents, but I’m sure these markings, used everywhere in Santa Clara Valley, will help reduce the chance of an accident. The motorist would have seen the dashed lines and have known that bikes are moving left to reach the bike lane.

Many motorists don’t ride bikes and may not be aware that’s how cyclists ride through the 280 freeway interchange.

This fatal bicycle-car accident once again reminds us that the autonomous car will be the best thing that could ever happen to make cycling safer. Unfortunately, Jeffrey Donnelly will not live to see the day.

Below is a video of the scene of the accident. I encountered a car coming from behind on Page Mill headed for the on-ramp. I looked back twice as the car slowed dramatically. It was only then that I continued left over to the bike lane.

DeAnza College makes a small change for cyclists

November 2, 2015

Access improved on DeAnza College campus to McClellan Road.

Access improved on DeAnza College campus to McClellan Road.


Back in July 2011, I mentioned on my blog how it would be nice if a small access road from DeAnza campus to McClellan Road could be open for two-wheel vehicles.

Lo and behold, it was done! I noticed it today on my ride. The access point bridges between De Anza College Parkway and McClellan Road, near the Hwy 85 overpass. There’s good visibility both directions.

Cyclists can now use this route as a continuation from the Mary Avenue bike path through Cupertino.

It may have been something the school intended to do well before 2011, but whatever the reason, it’s greatly appreciated.

This access point at DeAnza College and McClellan Road no longer has chains across the path.

This access point at DeAnza College and McClellan Road no longer has chains across the path.

Silicon Valley needs a transportation system like Zurich’s

October 28, 2015

One of the more colorful trams in Zurich.

One of the more colorful trams in Zurich.


Today’s San Jose Mercury News ran an editorial by architect Thang Do that outlined what we need to do to make Silicon Valley a better place to live.

He warns that with all the construction underway, we better do something about our transportation system or we’re headed for permanent gridlock.

He mentions Zurich as a shining example of a city that understands public transportation. Here’s why:

The city has an integrated and comprehensive network of tram, rail, bus, and even riverboats to take you where you want to go in the city, throughout the country for that matter. One ticket gives access to all public transportation, with the exception of intra-city rail.

Imagine stepping out of the Zurich airport with all your luggage and walking fewer than 50 yards to a waiting tram whose platform is flush to the pavement. Just roll your baggage on.

A model of transportation efficiency. Hauptbahnhof station with bike racks.

A model of transportation efficiency. Hauptbahnhof station with bike racks.


Every tram has an LED screen that shows your location and the stops ahead, including connecting trams. Every stop has a shelter with an LED sign indicating the time of arrival for trams, along with machines for purchasing tickets.

Local trains accommodate bicycles and stations have large areas dedicated to bicycle parking. Many streets have bicycle lanes and because there are relatively few cars on the streets, traffic is not an issue.

VTA light rail does have one up on the Swiss trams: VTA provides racks for bikes.

Zurich and Switzerland have thought of everything when it comes to getting around on public transportation. There’s no need to own a car, which is a reality for most people living in the landlocked country. That’s a good thing because living in Zurich is as expensive, if not more so, than living in Silicon Valley.

We can learn from Zurich. The sad truth about Silicon Valley is that the Valley of the Heart’s Delight once had a wonderful light-rail network, which was dismantled piece by piece with the arrival of the automobile.

Light-rail line from the late 1800s exposed on The Alameda in 1984 at Santa Clara University bypass.

Light-rail line from the late 1800s exposed on The Alameda in 1984 at Santa Clara University bypass.

In hindsight, we blew it, but we mustn’t give up hope. We can build a transportation system equal to that of Zurich. All we have to do is, in the words of Patrick Stewart: “Make it so.”

Even the fanciest shopping area, Bahnhofstrasse, has light rail.

Even the fanciest shopping area, Bahnhofstrasse, has light rail.

Intra-city and intra-regional trains whisk you all over the country with ease.

Intra-city and intra-regional trains whisk you all over the country with ease.

Tram interiors are roomy and accommodate luggage.

Tram interiors are roomy and accommodate luggage.

Ticket machines are everywhere and take all manner of payment.

Ticket machines are everywhere and take all manner of payment.

You can even take riverboats in Zurich. They thought of everything.

You can even take riverboats in Zurich. They thought of everything.

Mount Umunhum summit poised to open in Fall 2016

October 24, 2015

The latest word from the open space district is that the Mt. Umunhum summit will be open in fall 2016. That means they’ll repave the five-mile stretch of road up from Hicks Road.

There’s a trail under construction from the Bald Mountain Parking Area a couple miles below the summit, slated to open in spring 2017.

It looks like a decision on the fate of the cube will be determined after October 2017 when a private/public partnership needs to be in place.

As for the opening of Loma Prieta Road, which is what we really care about, there’s no mention of a timeline. I’m still wagering it won’t happen in my lifetime.

KQED posted a nice historic video on Mount Umunhum.

Update: The project completion has been delayed until spring 2017.

Moffett Field Trail closed

October 24, 2015

Bay Trail at Moffett Field is closed for resurfacing.

Bay Trail at Moffett Field is closed for resurfacing.


Bay Trail in Mountain View, at Moffett Field, is closed for resurfacing. It should be open in early February.

This is a nice trail to take around Moffett from Sunnyvale to Mountain View, although it gets muddy when wet.

The alternate route is described on a Bay Trail website.

Moorpark Avenue goes on a road diet

August 27, 2015

Moorpark Avenue in West San Jose on a road diet. I had the road all to myself.

Moorpark Avenue in West San Jose on a road diet. I had the road all to myself.


Moorpark Avenue has been put on a road diet, which is a good thing if you’re a cyclist or pedestrian living in West San Jose, and maybe so-so for motorists.

I can understand why the four-lane road was reduced to two lanes and a center turn lane, mainly because there are two schools on Moorpark, Archbishop Mitty High School, DeVargas Elementary School, and Strawberry Park Challenger School nearby.

I rode it around noon on a hot day, so I saw no traffic to speak of, and one bicycle.

If any street needs to go on a road diet in the area, it’s Homestead Road. I see dozens of students walking and riding bikes to and from Homestead High School. Homestead is one of the more congested roads around and it’s only going to get worse once the Apple campus opens and the Vallco shopping mall gets its multi-billion-dollar makeover.

Unfortunately, we need wide, multi-lane streets like Homestead to support car traffic. If you took them out, there would be worse gridlock at rush hour.

I don’t think road diets are going to get people out of their cars to ride bikes to work. It will certainly make roads safer for students walking and riding to school, but humans are naturally averse to combining exercise with commuting.

I’ve written at length about all the excuses, some of them valid, so for now our best and probably only hope is for the autonomous car to come along.

We don’t like public transit, we don’t like riding bikes, so what other choice is there?

Lower Guadalupe River Trail closed

August 23, 2015

Guadalupe River Trail between Tasman Drive and Gold Street is closed until November.

Guadalupe River Trail between Tasman Drive and Gold Street is closed until November.


In case you were planning to ride on the Guadalupe River Trail, note that it’s closed until November from Tasman Drive to Gold Street in Alviso.

PG&E is working on a gas line that requires levy work.

The other side of the river has a dirt levy, and that’s still open.

Ritchey Break-Away retrieved!

July 27, 2015

Enjoying my time at Lisa's Hot Dog stand waiting for a ride home from Alviso after retrieving my stolen bike.

Enjoying my time at Lisa’s Hot Dog stand waiting for a ride home from Alviso after retrieving my stolen bike.


I headed back to the scene of the crime a couple hours later on my other bike and what do I see on Gold Street but a guy riding my Ritchey!

I confronted him and it quickly became apparent he was harmless and had mental issues. He tried to claim he bought it off someone. Fat chance.

I had seen him at the bathroom earlier. He turned over the bike and we talked a bit. It’s really sad to know people like that are out there.

He removed the stuff in my seat bag, bike camera and bike computer, but I may still get them back because I met some nice folks who own a hot dog stand on Gold Street and know the thief well.

It’s Lisa’s Hot Dogs. She sells excellent tamales.

———————–

I can’t bear to think about it — another bike stolen.

It happened this morning while I was in the Santa Clara Valley Water District bathroom in Alviso next to the Guadalupe River trail.

Somebody just walked up and rode off or put it in their car.

Sigh.

Last photo. I added a new front rim, black Mavic Open Pro.

Last photo. I added a new front rim, black Mavic Open Pro.