Archive for the ‘Products’ Category

Cameras capture memories to last a lifetime

March 8, 2019

Sony’s RX100 pocket camera takes great pics with plenty of megapixels.


In the age of digital everything, progress doesn’t stand still and that applies to pocket cameras. For the past seven years I’ve been using a Sony RX100. In camera years, that’s about a century.

The camera works flawlessly and at 20 megapixels it’s all I need for resolution. What came before the Sony is a series of cameras dating back to December 1980. Here’s the history.

Previous to the Sony, I used a Canon PowerShot SD850 starting in 2007, which at the time offered everything I could ask for. At 8 megapixels it could take photos large enough for my needs. However, it suffered in low light.

Canon SD850is, my go-to camera before the Sony RX100


It was small, durable, had a viewfinder, panorama mode, and took great photos. It was a sophisticated camera with a lot of adjustability in its day. That’s good and bad.

When you’re out on a bike ride you typically don’t want to fuss with settings. I shoot in manual mode on occasion, but I find myself using the Auto setting most of the time.

This camera also had excellent 640×480 video. However, don’t forget that wind noise will ruin the audio, and there’s plenty of wind while riding.

Days of Film
I’m going to turn back the time machine to the days of film. Remember film? I started taking photos on bike rides in December 1980 when I bought an Olympus XA pocket camera. By no means was it the first pocket camera, but it was one of the first mass-produced, affordable, lightweight pocket cameras on the market. It took great photos.

Olympus XA2 was a fantastic value and one of the best film pocket cameras ever made.


No discussion of pocket cameras would be complete without mentioning the Rollei 35. Introduced in 1966, the German-made (later Singapore) camera was revolutionary in its day. It took superb photos, however it was dogged by a light meter needle that broke. Later versions went to LED light meters, but they had their own problems.

I use a long neck strap and put the camera in my jersey pocket, protected in a sandwich bag to keep out the sweat. These pocket cameras are so easy to handle I can take photos while riding no-hands.

In the days before digital, I shot mostly Kodak 64 color transparencies. We had a Kodak lab in Palo Alto that could give a quick turn-around at a good price. I’ve scanned many of my slides using a Konica Minolta Dimage Scanner, no longer made.

Contax T disappoints
In 1985 I decided to upgrade, so I spent a whopping $400 on a ContaxT. It was supposed to be the best pocket camera in the universe. By any measure, it was a finely crafted pocket camera, but I can’t say it was worth the price. I got comparable results with the Olympus. Photos of my Europe trips were taken with the Contax T.

Contax T promised the world in film but didn’t deliver. A fine camera, but prone to breaking.


What was worse, my dream camera broke, not once but twice. I returned it and paid $135 each time for a repair, neither which lasted long. I would get back clear slides. The shutter must have been sticking.

My next camera was a Pentax IQ Zoom. It was bulky but it had a powerful zoom. I didn’t use this camera long before I switched to digital. I also shot a lot of print film with it, for some odd reason.

Enter the digital world
Around 2004 I switched to digital, starting with a Fuji Finepix a303. At 3 megapixels it was fine for the Web. The camera was easy to use and took great photos.

Fuji Finepix was my first digital camera. A great workhorse that delivered fine pics.


Longing for something with more pixels, I purchased a Pentax Optio S60. Pentax has long been my favorite camera maker, but I discovered a drawback. I had to compose the photo without a viewfinder. The LCD screen was large, but in bright light I couldn’t see what I was shooting.

Pentax OptioS60 was good, but not great as a digital camera.


Still, it was a fine camera and I used its special panorama setting often. Software that came with the camera could stitch together three photos.

It’s amazing to see all the excellent pocket cameras on the market. No matter which brand you choose, you can’t go wrong. These magic boxes preserve memories and that’s about as close as we’ll ever get to being young and strong again.

Today’s best cameras
I recommend two cameras: the Sony RX100 Model III and the Canon PowerShot G9 X Mark II. I think Sony overreached with its latest RX100 Model VI. It sacrifices low-light performance for zoom. Canon’s G9 Mark II is easily the best value. Both cameras are the smallest on the market.

Finally, a word on smartphone cameras. They’re great, but I sometimes like to preserve an image in RAW format. RAW has huge advantages over jpeg for preserving image quality. Some phones will capture in RAW, so check it out if you don’t want a dedicated camera.

GPS vs. Avocet 35: Which is more accurate?

April 1, 2018

Avocet 35 cyclometer compares favorably against the Garmin 500 for miles ridden.


Don’t expect me to give you an answer to this burning question. The Avocet 35 was one of the most accurate cyclometers on the market, and still is today, long after it bit the dust.

I calibrated my Avocet cyclometer before the ride, and measured it against a known distance to confirm. The tire pressure may have been off a few pounds.

The result on a recent ride with some rocky trail was 46.55 miles for Avcoet, 46.47 to the Garmin Edge 500.

I looked up the accuracy of GPS and came across Sheldon Brown’s description (speaking to us from the grave) of GPS, which has interesting details explaining why GPS can have some variations. A must read.

On a ride back in 2008, I compared the VDO with the ancient Specialized Pro. My Hecker Pass route totaled exactly the same distance of 95.72 miles!

Two of my favorite cyclometers matched perfectly on a 95 mile ride. Uncanny.

Making a case for an ancient side-pull brake

March 31, 2017

Aging Campagnolo rear brake caliper finds new life on my road bike, solving several problems.


I’ve always been a fan of Campagnolo Nuovo/Super Record brakes because they were built to last and looked nice.

But with age comes weaker hands and I have difficulty squeezing the front brakes hard enough to stop quickly. It’s an issue with those old Campagnolo brakes because they had a 1-1 cable pull ratio.

I can’t begin to explain how brakes work, but suffice it to say they use cables and fulcrums to create mechanical advantage. The bottom line is that the higher the mechanical advantage, the easier it is to exert force. Today’s brakes mostly use a 3:1 mechanical advantage.

But it comes at a cost. As Jobst Brandt so often pointed out in the biketech forum, Campagnolo brakes of yore had the advantage of working even with a wobbly wheel, say after breaking a spoke. As brake pads wore, you didn’t have to adjust your brakes so often. Finally, Campagnolo brakes could accommodate fat tires with ease due to a quick-release that opened the brake calipers plenty wide.

All that said, I decided to try Campagnolo brakes on my modern brake levers. The result was not good. I found the front brake hard to use. I had to pull especially hard to stop. The Campagnolo brake arms work better with their original levers, but they’re still harder to use than Shimano Ultegra or other modern brakes.

After giving it some thought, I tried using the Campagnolo brake caliper in the rear only. That worked well. It’s still not quite as easy to use the rear brake, but 90 percent of your stopping power comes from the front brake. No big deal.

I gained the advantages of using Campagnolo calipers, and that is a big deal on the rear wheel where most flats occur and spokes break much more often. I especially dislike Shimano brakes when it comes to removing a wheel with a 28 mm wide tire. That’s no longer a problem with the Campagnolo rear brake.

Doing the research made me realize that brake ratios are not something taken lightly by the bike industry. Bike companies are constantly fiddling with brakes by changing ratios and designs that try to fix problems. However, like so many well-meaning engineering efforts, the lack of understanding about how things work has delivered us some less-than-satisfactory solutions over the years.

More reading here:
Arts Cyclery; Park Tool; Bike Forums; Cycling UK

Wool jacket fits active lifestyles

January 4, 2017

I purchased the Sheep Dip jacket. Other garments are available.

I purchased the Sheep Dip jacket. Other garments are available.


I haven’t owned a wool clothing item in eons, so when Dave McLaughlin offered a jacket on Kickstarter, I figured I could use one for those wet cold days, like the one today.

A Kickstarter purchase is never a sure thing, so when it arrived on time I was already ahead of the game. I’ve had all good luck with Kickstarter, purchasing a bike bell made in San Francisco, a board game, a book, and a cycling video camera.

Quality has generally been excellent with only one minor disappointment. The video camera broke, but it was replaced free of charge.

I’ve been wearing the jacket more often with colder weather, so I can now give my review. I’m pleased with the purchase, with two exceptions. The sleeves are a little tight at the wrist when putting on the jacket. The sleeves are just right once on.

It’s itchy. However, with wear that is becoming less noticeable and I expect it will disappear with time. The fabric reminds me of felt, a blend of wool and polyester. It’s washable in cold water.

What I like about the jacket first and foremost: it’s fashionable. It fits perfectly on my slim frame. I like the full-length zipper and the abundant, large pockets, a big plus on cold days when you want to keep your hands warm. My size is medium.

It’s not a cycling jacket, but you can wear it for short bike rides around town with no problem. Dave designed his jacket for post-exercise activities, like going to a restaurant or visiting friends, and so on.

Another plus is that the jacket keeps me warm. No complaints in that department. Wool is a great fabric for warmth even when wet.

The price was a real deal on Kickstarter and it’s still competitive with other similar jackets on the market. If you’re interested in buying a jacket and supporting a veteran Northern California cyclist with your purchase, check it out on the DMAC website or on Facebook.

2017 Bay Area Bike Rides Calendar

November 25, 2016
2107 calendar cover. Available now.

2107 calendar cover. Available now.

I create a Bay Area Bike Rides calendar every year, mostly for fun and to remember my rides for the year. Enjoy.

Ultegra Cassette lasts 25,000 miles

May 2, 2016

Cassettes wear out eventually. Small cogs go first.

Cassettes wear out eventually. Small cogs go first.


Inquiring minds want to know: How long will my freewheel cassette last? How about 25,000 miles?

That’s what I got from my Ultegra 6700. Here are some caveats:

1. Cleaned the chain regularly, like every 500 miles.

2. Rode mostly on pavement, only about 2 percent off-road.

3. Replaced the chains between 0.5 and 0.75 on the Park chain-wear measurement tool.

So how do you know when your cassette sprockets are worn? The chain skips or catches sometimes; you feel the occasional slip when starting up. Note that when a chain is worn, front chainwheel shifting degrades.

Track your miles. I can’t imagine a cassette lasting more miles than what I got from mine.

Once again, I got about 6,500 miles [WRONG. I SWITCH CHAINS. I GOT ABOUT 3,500 MILES] from Ultegra 6600/6701 chains. I could not detect any difference between the models in terms of longevity or shifting.

Unless you break a sprocket, I wouldn’t bother trying to save money by swapping out the smaller or worn cogs. I replaced only the sprockets, not the body. It’s running smoothly.

Finally, my Ultegra brake pads lasted about 25,000 miles as well. I moved the back to the front to extend life. I still have the originals on the back, so more than 25,000 miles with careful management. Of course, I ride where there are a lot of hills, so these pads could last longer.

Continental Grand Sport Race rolls for 7,500 miles!

March 10, 2016

A Continental Grand Sport Race lasted 7,500 miles on my rear wheel.

A Continental Grand Sport Race lasted 7,500 miles on my rear wheel.


What’s my favorite tire? After just replacing my Continental Grand Sport Race (700×28 folding) with 7,500 miles, the answer is obvious!

I put this tire on my rear wheel in November 2014. It stayed there all that time. I’ve gotten 5,400 miles from a Continental GatorSkin.

During that time I had about two flats. This tire is built to last, made in China.

The tire sells for about $35. That works out to about $1 every 214 miles. That means a century ride costs me $1 in total tire wear.

Lilliputian bike light an LED marvel

September 17, 2015

Is there a smaller bike light? From Kikkerland.

Is there a smaller bike light? From Kikkerland.


We have LED lights, yet another semiconductor marvel, to thank for small, powerful bike lights that brighten those rides home in the dark.

None would be smaller than the Lilliputian Kikkerland® flasher bike light.

I found this useful doo-dad at The Container Store for $2.99, including front and rear units. While the size and price are small, the amount of light it puts out is nothing of the sort.

In the fast- or slow-flash mode you’ll be seen with ease at night, both front (white) and rear (red). In the non-flash mode you can even see the road ahead.

Weighing just 7 grams each, you can’t complain about the weight. The clever mounting is fabulous. There’s a stretchy rubber loop that wraps around the handlebar. The body has two small notches to hold the loop. It’s a secure fit.

They come with replaceable CR1220 batteries, which are a breeze to change.

The only issue you may have is that they’re flimsy and may require some tape or glue to keep in one piece. Other than that, they’re a handy item to keep in a bike bag for those rides at night when you’re caught without a light.

Check out the video above.

Sigma rear brake light gives warning

August 20, 2015
The unobtrusive Sigma rear brake light has a bright LED

The unobtrusive Sigma rear brake light has a bright LED

I immediately liked the concept of the Sigma rear brake light — lightweight (7 grams), easy to install, affordable ($10), a safety feature.

Here’s what I think after making a purchase.

Installation is not as easy as it looks. I had to back out the Shimano Ultegra adjustment barrel all the way to accommodate the light. They recommend at least 25 mm of exposed brake cable.

Be sure to push the light firmly against the brake cable in order for the screw to securely clamp the brake cable.

I’d like to see a better fit for the screw against the cable. As it is now, it mashes down on the brake cable.

Test to see that the brake light doesn’t get stuck on. That can happen, if it’s not installed properly.

You’ll need a 2.5 mm Allen key. The light comes with a CR1025 lithium battery, which should last at least a year or two.

It comes in five colors, but I think red and white have the best visibility against the red LED.

Now you can see when your ride partner is braking while descending Page Mill Road, or motorists can know when you’re stopping for a light, assuming they’re not looking down while texting.

Available now at the Bicycle Outfitter, Los Altos, and other fine bike shops.

Endura gloves fit for a long ride

July 16, 2015

Endura Hyperon glove wears well, but be careful with the size.

Endura Hyperon glove wears well, but be careful with the size.


After my less than satisfactory experience with Pearl Izumi gloves, I went to my local bike shop to try another brand and settled on Endura, a Scottish company in business since 1992.

I had never heard of Endura, but I’m not buying bike gloves every day. I liked the amount of gel padding and it seemed to be strategically placed, so I tried them on. Much to my surprise M felt too small. I tried L and even they felt a bit tight, but I bought L anyway because I’ve always worn M and there’s no way XL would be correct.

I knew they would stretch and sure enough they did. Now they’re a good fit if a tiny bit on the loose side, but the last thing I want is a tight glove.

I’ve worn them on some long rides and I can say they’re not causing any problems. They don’t get in the way of the ride or cause discomfort. I could use a bit more gel, but only if added in a certain way. Back in the day, Gant gloves were the best brand out there. They had good padding that covered the entire palm. If more padding is added, the entire palm must be covered like the Gant, otherwise the padding will have the “pebble” effect.

Removal is problematic with these gloves, as it is for others. They have reinforced fingers for easier removal though.

There’s a “terry sweat wipe,” which I never use, but it’s there if you sweat a lot. I only realized it existed after reading the literature.

Endura has lots of models for cyclists who have specific needs. Cost is on the high end for a bike glove, but that may be because these glove are, much to my surprise, made in Scotland. Build quality looks to be top-notch.

I don’t care where a product is made, as long as it’s good quality. In our global economy, that can be a hard pill to swallow. It certainly ratchets up competition. But I digress. Global economics is best left for other blogs.

I'm told this is how to size for gloves. I'm 8 cm, clearly a M.

I’m told this is how to size for gloves. I’m 8 cm, clearly a M.